Brazil Gambling Proposal Still Waiting for Senate’s Approval

Posted by: CasinosOnline in Casino News
The bill would reopen casinos across the country, allowing video bingo, sports and non-sports betting, as well as online casinos.

The bill was introduced by Senator Nogueira four years ago.

Brazil is still making small steps toward the legalisation of gambling, and although the progress is slow, things are moving forward as we speak.

The bill PLS 186/2014, introduced by Senator Nogueira four years ago, and later amended by Senator De Lira, will be reviewed in the State Plenary.

An Approval Would Mean Everything

If this bill gets enacted, it would reopen casinos across the country, allowing video bingo, sports and non-sports betting, as well as online casinos.

The states would be tasked with issuing gambling licenses, which would be valid for 20 years for bingo and video bingo halls, and 30 years for casinos. Although the House Committee on Constitution, Justice and Citizenship said no to the bill earlier this year, it still has the chance to move forward. However, before this bill can reach the Senate plenary, two additional bills will have to be considered.

The first was introduced by Senator Coelho, and his proposal provides for the promotion of ecotourism in Federal Conservation Units, raising revenue using venues which would be allowed to offer their service on protected land.

The second one called for a further analysis of Nogueira’s bill, with the main focus on the development of the regional tourism industry.

A New Chance

Back in 2015, Senator De Lira lobbied for the adoption of Senator Nogueira’s bill, stating the regulation of gambling would effectively mean more money generated by taxes. He also said it would promote tourism, bring more jobs and investments, and increase tax collection.

A year later, the Senate rejected the bill, sending it back to the House Committee on Constitution, Justice and Citizenship for further analysis.

De Lira introduced a new proposal late last year, asking for a new hearing to be scheduled as soon as possible. His proposal was basically an amended version of the original one, offering a wide range of regulatory changes, especially when it comes to an anti-money laundering measures, player protection and taxation.

The House Committee on Constitution, Justice and Citizenship committee rejected the bill once again in March this year, stating the bill could encourage certain criminal practices such as money laundering, while at the same time increasing gambling addiction among the players.